bycrom
bycrom:

Today’s preorder sample presents an amazing guest comic by my inimitable comicker-in-arms, tatterhood! 
Kris is a brilliant artist, a warrior woman, and the sort of person who doesn’t seem to hesitate when faced with any sort of technical challenge whatsoever. She’s got two finished comics up on Weald Comics and as well as participating in Full Colour Cromulence, she will be releasing her first chapter of Tatterhood in Weald’s first issue, also launching at TCAF and VanCAF this May!

Did you see @tatterhood’s guest comic for Full Colour Cromulence?

bycrom:

Today’s preorder sample presents an amazing guest comic by my inimitable comicker-in-arms, tatterhood

Kris is a brilliant artist, a warrior woman, and the sort of person who doesn’t seem to hesitate when faced with any sort of technical challenge whatsoever. She’s got two finished comics up on Weald Comics and as well as participating in Full Colour Cromulence, she will be releasing her first chapter of Tatterhood in Weald’s first issue, also launching at TCAF and VanCAF this May!

Did you see @tatterhood’s guest comic for Full Colour Cromulence?

sfemonster
sfemonster:

The second volume of my Patreon sketchbook went online today!
What’s Patreon? It’s a great way to directly support me, my comics, and the work I do via monthly pledges! What’s the Patreon sketchbook? It’s a brand new thing I’m doing- every month I’m creating a Patreon-exclusive PDF jam packed with character designs, concept art, miscellaneous monsters, and doodles.  The month’s sketchbook is 25 pages, with loads of colour and stuff you won’t see anywhere else.How do I get in on this sweet Patreon action? Head on over to patreon.com/sfemonster.  There’s lots going on- early weekly Eth’s Skin updates, previews and WIPs, and first looks at new projects. 
Thank you for your support!

sfemonster:

The second volume of my Patreon sketchbook went online today!

What’s Patreon? It’s a great way to directly support me, my comics, and the work I do via monthly pledges!
What’s the Patreon sketchbook? It’s a brand new thing I’m doing- every month I’m creating a Patreon-exclusive PDF jam packed with character designs, concept art, miscellaneous monsters, and doodles.  The month’s sketchbook is 25 pages, with loads of colour and stuff you won’t see anywhere else.
How do I get in on this sweet Patreon action? Head on over to patreon.com/sfemonster.  There’s lots going on- early weekly Eth’s Skin updates, previews and WIPs, and first looks at new projects. 

Thank you for your support!

friendshipedition
verwho:

Friendship Edition is making a book! I’m one of the artists that makes up this collective, and we’re doing a 3-colour risograph book. It’s mostly short comics (3-5 pages each) and some art and illustration. It’ll be available at TCAF!
My story is 5 pages long and tells a story about coping with death through graffiti.


Look for this at TCAF cause it’s chock full of stuff this gorgeous!

verwho:

Friendship Edition is making a book! I’m one of the artists that makes up this collective, and we’re doing a 3-colour risograph book. It’s mostly short comics (3-5 pages each) and some art and illustration. It’ll be available at TCAF!

My story is 5 pages long and tells a story about coping with death through graffiti.

Look for this at TCAF cause it’s chock full of stuff this gorgeous!

bycrom

bycrom:

Today I want to send out a thank you to the two brilliant barbaric minds who graced my book with their kind words!

Thanks to Epidiah Ravachol, creator of Worlds Without Master and owner of Dig a Thousand Holes publishing!

And thanks to Rebecca Dart, a woman of great wisdom with a taste for the goriest of battles.

Two such allies in this quest have been invaluable! Go share your love!

And don’t forget that you can preorder Full Colour Cromulence! We’re launching at TCAF in Toronto May 10-11, but if you order your copy ahead of time you’ll get a preorder discount, and the first 25 get sketched copies! Go ahead, take a look!

anatomicalart

quoms:

cupiscent:

petermorwood:

ancientpanoply:

A video made for the Museum of Cluny, and its “The Sword: Uses, Myths and Symbols” exhibit. It tries to dispel some of the beliefs that are still prevalent today about the weight and mobility of fighters in plate armor and show some of the techniques used in combat against armored opponents

I’m always pleased to see videos like this. It’s as if people won’t believe unless they’re shown (and there are always some who go “ah, yes, well, in aluminium stage armour it’s easy.”)

Well, the Museum Cluny video, like the Royal Armoury demo team, uses real steel armour: those two pictures at the start show the originals; the video uses reproductions because no curator will let someone take two exhibits from his museum and roll them around on flagstones. Mike Loades in the UK has been doing similar armour demonstrations for years, as has Tobias Capwell of the Wallace Collection. Eventually the old “clunky, immobile, in with a wrench, out with a can-opener” image of plate armour will go away – but I won’t hold my breath. (That shade of purple isn’t a good complexion anyway…)

Even the faster demonstrations of these combat techniques are still dialled back to about half speed. Try to visualise how much quicker and more brutal this would be if the two fighters meant business, when the first rule was Do It To Him As Quickly As Possible Before He Does It To You.

Writer and swordsman Guy Windsor writes about doing motion-capture work for a computer game; his completely authentic techniques couldn’t be used because they were so small, fast and economical. The game needed big swashing movements because the real thing looked unrealistic, too insignificant to be effective…

You won’t see a “killing fight” (full speed, full power, full intent) recreated very often, either on documentaries or in museum exhibitions, because it’s very, very dangerous for (when you think about it) obvious reasons. These techniques from 600-year-old fight manuals were how men in armour maimed and killed other men in armour - and since they’re the original material, not a re-interpretation after 600 years of being diluted down to sport-safe levels, the techniques will still maim and kill men in armour. Even a blunt “safe” sword is pointed enough (first demo on the video, 1:54-59) to go into a helmet’s eye-slot and through the skull inside…

But if you’re lucky enough to see a full-speed demo between fighters in real armour using wasters (wooden practice swords), be prepared to pick your jaw up from the floor. It is awesome. And also as scary as hell.

Comments on comments:

"Pretty much proof positive that the people who claim that skimpy female fantasy armor is for increased maneuverability don’t know what they’re talking about."

They know exactly what they’re talking about. They want to see T&A on fantasy game and book covers, and since they don’t have the balls to be honest about it, this is their excuse.

It amazes me that the old saws about Western armour and techniques are still going about, because surely two minutes’ thought would let you know that of course knights had to be able to get up off the ground…  Europeans were wearing armour for centuries, why wouldn’t they develop techniques of fighting in it?

It’s easier to laugh (do the same people laugh about samurai?) and repeat what “everyone knows about armour" than it is to waste that two minutes thought. Thinking might reveal something to mess with set opinions, and that would be annoying…

Biggest pet peeve: People commenting on the weight and shape of armour restricting mobility…

As before - “everybody knows" that European armour is massive and clunky because that’s what "everybody knows.” God forbid they should ever apply the “if it was so useless then why was it used" logic to anything. Because then they might realise that what "everybody knows" is wrong.

I’m going off to (not) hold my breath for a while… :-P

I saw this video in the fascinating special exhibit at Cluny last time we were in Paris. So pleased to be able to have it on tap, because it was most excellent.

image