anatomicalart

quoms:

cupiscent:

petermorwood:

ancientpanoply:

A video made for the Museum of Cluny, and its “The Sword: Uses, Myths and Symbols” exhibit. It tries to dispel some of the beliefs that are still prevalent today about the weight and mobility of fighters in plate armor and show some of the techniques used in combat against armored opponents

I’m always pleased to see videos like this. It’s as if people won’t believe unless they’re shown (and there are always some who go “ah, yes, well, in aluminium stage armour it’s easy.”)

Well, the Museum Cluny video, like the Royal Armoury demo team, uses real steel armour: those two pictures at the start show the originals; the video uses reproductions because no curator will let someone take two exhibits from his museum and roll them around on flagstones. Mike Loades in the UK has been doing similar armour demonstrations for years, as has Tobias Capwell of the Wallace Collection. Eventually the old “clunky, immobile, in with a wrench, out with a can-opener” image of plate armour will go away – but I won’t hold my breath. (That shade of purple isn’t a good complexion anyway…)

Even the faster demonstrations of these combat techniques are still dialled back to about half speed. Try to visualise how much quicker and more brutal this would be if the two fighters meant business, when the first rule was Do It To Him As Quickly As Possible Before He Does It To You.

Writer and swordsman Guy Windsor writes about doing motion-capture work for a computer game; his completely authentic techniques couldn’t be used because they were so small, fast and economical. The game needed big swashing movements because the real thing looked unrealistic, too insignificant to be effective…

You won’t see a “killing fight” (full speed, full power, full intent) recreated very often, either on documentaries or in museum exhibitions, because it’s very, very dangerous for (when you think about it) obvious reasons. These techniques from 600-year-old fight manuals were how men in armour maimed and killed other men in armour - and since they’re the original material, not a re-interpretation after 600 years of being diluted down to sport-safe levels, the techniques will still maim and kill men in armour. Even a blunt “safe” sword is pointed enough (first demo on the video, 1:54-59) to go into a helmet’s eye-slot and through the skull inside…

But if you’re lucky enough to see a full-speed demo between fighters in real armour using wasters (wooden practice swords), be prepared to pick your jaw up from the floor. It is awesome. And also as scary as hell.

Comments on comments:

"Pretty much proof positive that the people who claim that skimpy female fantasy armor is for increased maneuverability don’t know what they’re talking about."

They know exactly what they’re talking about. They want to see T&A on fantasy game and book covers, and since they don’t have the balls to be honest about it, this is their excuse.

It amazes me that the old saws about Western armour and techniques are still going about, because surely two minutes’ thought would let you know that of course knights had to be able to get up off the ground…  Europeans were wearing armour for centuries, why wouldn’t they develop techniques of fighting in it?

It’s easier to laugh (do the same people laugh about samurai?) and repeat what “everyone knows about armour" than it is to waste that two minutes thought. Thinking might reveal something to mess with set opinions, and that would be annoying…

Biggest pet peeve: People commenting on the weight and shape of armour restricting mobility…

As before - “everybody knows" that European armour is massive and clunky because that’s what "everybody knows.” God forbid they should ever apply the “if it was so useless then why was it used" logic to anything. Because then they might realise that what "everybody knows" is wrong.

I’m going off to (not) hold my breath for a while… :-P

I saw this video in the fascinating special exhibit at Cluny last time we were in Paris. So pleased to be able to have it on tap, because it was most excellent.

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bycrom
bycrom:

Today I’m sharing your first sneak peek at the bonus guest comics featured in Full Colour Cromulence. I asked nine brilliant cartoonists to share a scene of them hanging out with their spirit guides, and wow did they ever run with the idea! First up here is Matt Smith rocking the fuck out with his chosen spirit guide, Quorthon of Bathory.
You can check out Matt’s illustration work at matt-illustrations and you gotta check out his barbaric and poetic comic barbarianlord, it’s fucking epic. 
The preorder for Full Colour Cromulence runs until May 9th, and the first 25 orders get sketches! Snag yours today for advice, wisdom and metahhhhl!

bycrom:

Today I’m sharing your first sneak peek at the bonus guest comics featured in Full Colour Cromulence. I asked nine brilliant cartoonists to share a scene of them hanging out with their spirit guides, and wow did they ever run with the idea! First up here is Matt Smith rocking the fuck out with his chosen spirit guide, Quorthon of Bathory.

You can check out Matt’s illustration work at matt-illustrations and you gotta check out his barbaric and poetic comic barbarianlord, it’s fucking epic. 

The preorder for Full Colour Cromulence runs until May 9th, and the first 25 orders get sketches! Snag yours today for advice, wisdom and metahhhhl!

fuckyeahhardfemme

21 Tips to Keep Your Shit Together When You’re Depressed.


A while ago, I penned a fairly angry response to something circulating on the internet – the 21 Habits of Happy People. It pissed me off beyond belief, that there was an inference that if you weren’t Happy, you simply weren’t doing the right things.

I’ve had depression for as long as I can remember. It’s manifested in different ways. I did therapy. I did prozac. I did more therapy. My baseline is melancholic. I’d just made peace with it when I moved, unintentionally, to a place that had markedly less sunshine in the winter. I got seasonal depression. I got that under control. Then I got really, really sick. Turns out it’s a permanent, painful genetic disorder. My last pain-free day was four years ago.

So, this Cult of Happy article just set me off. Just… anger. Rage. Depression is serious – debilitating, often dangerous, and it’s got an enormous stigma. It leaves people to fend for themselves.

It’s bad enough without people ramming Happy Tips at you through facebook. There is no miracle behaviour change that will flip that switch for you. I know, I’ve tried.

A friend of mine suggested that I write something from my point of view because, surprisingly, I manage to give an outwards impression of having my shit together. I was shocked to hear this. And I find this comical, but I see her point. I’m functioning. I’ve adapted. I’m surprisingly okay. I think the medical term is “resilient”.

So, here it is.

My 21 Tips on Keeping Your Shit Together During Depression

1) Know that you’re not alone. Know that we are a silent legion, who, every day face the solipsism and judgement of Happy People Who Think We Just Aren’t Trying. There are people who are depressed, people who have been depressed, and people who just haven’t been hit with it yet.

2) Understand that the Happy People are usually acting out of some genuine (albeit misguided) concern for you, that it’s coming from a good place, even if the advice feels like you’re being blamed for your disease. Telling you these things makes them feel better, even if it makes you feel like shit. (If they insist on keeping it up, see #12.)

3) Enlist the help of a professional. See your doctor. You need to talk about the ugly shit, and there are people paid to listen and help you find your way to the light at the end of the tunnel.

4) Understand that antidepressants will only do so much. They’re useful, they’ll level you out and give you the time you need to figure out your own path to getting well. They can be helpful. There are lots to choose from. They may not be for you, and even if they are, they take some time to kick in. Conversely, they may not be for you. Work with your doctor.

5) Pick up a paintbrush, a pencil, an activity you got joy from in the past and re-explore that. Or, sign up for the thing you always wanted to try. There is a long history and link between depression and creativity. It’s a bright light of this condition, so utilize it to your best advantage.

6) Eat nutritionally sound, regular small meals. If you’re having trouble eating, try to focus on what you’d like to eat. I went through a whole six week episode of tomatoes and cream cheese on a bagel twice a day. Not great, but it was something – helpful context, I’m a recovered anorexic. Conversely, if all you want to do is scarf down crap, try to off-ramp it by downing a V-8 and doing #9 for 15 minutes, and see how you feel. Chucking your blood sugar all over hell’s half acre is going to make you feel worse.

7) While you’re doing #3, get some bloodwork done. If you’re low on iron or vitamin D, or if your hormone levels are doing the Macarena… these can all contribute to zapping your energy or switching your mood to Bleak As Hell.

8) If you’re in bed and the “insomnia hamsters”, as I like to call them, are on the wheel of your head, watch Nightly Business News on PBS. This has the effect of Nyquil. Swap out your coffee for herbal tea. If you just cannot sleep, try the next tip….

9) Learn how to meditate. Start by focusing on your breathing. Not sleep, not thoughts. In through the nose, out through the mouth. Meditation is focusing on being present in your body, not careening around in your brain. It may not be as good as sleep but it will give you some rest and recharge you.

10) Face a window as often as you can – at work, at home. Look out into the world. Watch. Observe. Try to find something you find pretty or interesting to focus on. And, handily remember that one in five of those people out there feel the way you do.

11) Cry. Better out than in. Sometimes it’s not convenient or career-enhancing to cry, so find a private place as best you can and let the tears go. Carry Kleenex and face wipes and extra concealer if you wear makeup. You can always claim allergies.

12) Any “friend” who resolutely believes that your depression is because you’re lazy, because you’re not trying hard enough, who blames you for not bootstrapping out of it- that friend needs to be cut off. Polite (#2) is one thing, but there is a limit. You don’t have to explain, you can just not respond. You feel badly enough, you don’t need their “assistance”.

13) Limit your time with people who drain you. You know who they are. Often you don’t have a choice- but you can put the meter on. And, subsequently, be aware of what you’re asking of those close to you.

14) Everyone has shit they’ve got to deal with. What you have been saddled with is your shit. Recognize, just as you’re not alone, you’re also not unique. The grass may look greener, you may be jealous or envious of others who don’t have to deal with depression, but you likely do not know everything that’s going on with them.

15) Let go or be dragged. This is an old Buddhist saying. It’s a very useful way to frame aspects of depression. Betrayal, anger, fear… letting go is a process – often a painful and difficult process - but it’s ultimately going to show you the path out of this terrible place. Repeating the mantra can help when you’re feeling gripped by these feelings.

16) Wear clothes that make you feel confident. It takes as much time to put on nice clothes as it does to put on sweatpants. You will want to wear the sweatpants. Fight the urge. The whole “look good/feel better” campaign isn’t limited to cancer and chemotherapy. Or women.

17) Avoid fictional drama and tragedy like the plague. No Grey’s Anatomy, no to The Notebook, or anything that won a Pulitzer prize. You’ve got enough going on In Real Life. Comedy only. Or trashy stuff. Old episodes of WonderWoman? I’ve got the box set. Mindless drivel, like the latest CGI blockbuster. Or clever, funny books. David Sedaris. Jenny Lawson. Fiction exists to elicit emotion, and the emotion you need to express most right now is laughter.

18) Simple exercise, if you can. It can be something as simple as taking the stairs up a flight, or walking around the block. It doesn’t have to be elaborate, it doesn’t have to involve climbing a mountain or running a marathon. Baby steps.

19) Depression will lie to you. Depression will try to tell you what others are thinking. That you are unloved and unworthy, that others think little of you or don’t care – or even wish you harm. You are not a psychic. Keep repeating that. “I am not a psychic”. Repeat. The only way to know what another person is thinking is to up and ask them.

20) If you are well and truly losing this battle, reach out to someone. I’ve been the random friendly-but-not-close person who has fielded the occasional outreach. I like to think I’m not judgemental and generally resourceful, and others have thought the same, so they called and asked. You know someone like me. And they will help you.

21) Forgive yourself. I’m writing out all these tips, and I can’t always muster the strength to even stick my nose outside, or walk up the stairs, or eat my vegetables. Today, I got outside for ten minutes. I will try again tomorrow. And I will try again the day after that.

medievalpoc

Janet Stephens, Independent Scholarship, and Roman Hairstyles

medievalpoc:

obfuscobble:

medievalpoc:

overlordrae replied to your post: eruditefag asked:I’m just wonderi…

Asking about how qualified someone is in academia always brings to mind how a hairdresser discovered how Roman hairstyles were done when many thought the portrait styles were just idealized fancy.

Janet Stephens, tearing down ur Ivory Tower:

Stephens, a hairdresser based in Baltimore, took a trip to the Walters Art Museum back in 2001 and learned about the intricate hairdos worn by Vestal Virgins so she could duplicate them herself. But she ended up delving further into the fashion and art history books than she’d anticipated. Four years later, Stephens made a phenomenal discovery that she says “essentially changed the field of classical hair studies.”

While reading Roman literature, she stumbled across the term “acus” which has been translated to “hairpin.” But Stephens’ experience with embroidery sparked the theory that these ancient hairdos were actually created using a needle and thread — which was pretty convincing. Her findings were published in the 2008 edition of the Journal of Roman Archaeology.

"That quote everyone was referencing for centuries, but no one took it literally until I came along," she said. “Maybe that was the naivety in me.”

When she’s not cutting, coloring and highlighting at Studio 921 Salon and Day Spa in Baltimore, Stephens is practicing what she preaches by recreating ancient Roman hairstyles at home. Her YouTube channel includes tutorials featuring background on the women who wore these intricate hairdos, insight on their hair textures, the types of styling tools used and how they’d maintain these looks.

But of course HOW DARE SHE QUESTION THE “ACCEPTED FACTS”, RIGHT?

:D

Y’all help I can’t stop watching these ancient roman hairstyling vids.

1. dang they had crazy hair ok?
2. SEW THAT HAIR
3. Who thought up these hairstyles like seriously it was some sort of party where they tried to build houses with hair or something
4. Someone thought this hairstyle up.  Now Janet Stephens recreates it.  At the end of the vid she even shows how to do those weird curl crowns that look like headbands but nope it’s hair.

SERiously!!!! I think people are underestimating just HOW COOL THIS IS:

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THERE ARE SIMPLE ONES, TOO!

Classical Greek Hairstyle:

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^ I would even do that!

bycrom
bycrom:

It’s time! I’m announcing it! The second book of By Crom!, Full Colour Cromulence, is now available for preorder!!
I’ll be launching it at torontocomics' Toronto Comic Arts Festival, May 10-11 at the Reference Library in Toronto, and then taking it to The Vancouver Comic Arts Festival, May 24-25 at the Roundhouse Mews in Vancouver, and The TAAFI Animation Arts Maarket, June 14-15 in the George Brown Waterfront Campus in Toronto.
You can get in on the preorder right here! Preordering gets you a special earlybird price, a loving dedication and, if you haven’t already got the first one, you can grab both books for $20! Full Colour Cromulence will start shipping out after TCAF.
I’m also offering a free sketch to the first 25 preorders! If you got one of those magic few, I’ll shoot you an email to let you know and get any requests off you.
This book is a bit different from the last and I’m going to spend the next few weeks showing you how - there are nine guest artists involved and they blew my mind with their contributions, guys!
And, finally, as always: the first book, The Collected By Crom!, containing all the black and white comics, can be grabbed in print here and as a pwyw pdf here. If you’ve always wanted By Crom! on your wall, you can also grab a postcard of it here, or the original artwork right here.
Thank you guys for all your support - I’m so excited to have all this colourful cromulence assembled into a final form!

GUYS I am SO EXCITED! BOOK PREORDER AWAAYYY….!!!

bycrom:

It’s time! I’m announcing it! The second book of By Crom!, Full Colour Cromulence, is now available for preorder!!

I’ll be launching it at torontocomicsToronto Comic Arts Festival, May 10-11 at the Reference Library in Toronto, and then taking it to The Vancouver Comic Arts Festival, May 24-25 at the Roundhouse Mews in Vancouver, and The TAAFI Animation Arts Maarket, June 14-15 in the George Brown Waterfront Campus in Toronto.

You can get in on the preorder right here! Preordering gets you a special earlybird price, a loving dedication and, if you haven’t already got the first one, you can grab both books for $20! Full Colour Cromulence will start shipping out after TCAF.

I’m also offering a free sketch to the first 25 preorders! If you got one of those magic few, I’ll shoot you an email to let you know and get any requests off you.

This book is a bit different from the last and I’m going to spend the next few weeks showing you how - there are nine guest artists involved and they blew my mind with their contributions, guys!

And, finally, as always: the first book, The Collected By Crom!, containing all the black and white comics, can be grabbed in print here and as a pwyw pdf here. If you’ve always wanted By Crom! on your wall, you can also grab a postcard of it here, or the original artwork right here.

Thank you guys for all your support - I’m so excited to have all this colourful cromulence assembled into a final form!

GUYS I am SO EXCITED! BOOK PREORDER AWAAYYY….!!!

alchemichael

alchemichael:

these are some Lovecraftian illustrations I was hired to produce for my pal Scott R. Jones.

When The Stars Are Right: Towards An Authentic R’lyehian Spirituality, author Scott R Jones deftly breaks down the barriers between the rational and the irrational, between the bright logic of our daytime intellect and the fearful non-Euclidean symmetries of our darkest dreams. In the process, the truth of the Great Old Ones is revealed in all its cosmic resonance.”

http://martianmigrainepress.com/when-the-stars-are-right-towards-an-authentic-rlyehian-spirituality